International Cryptozoology Conference: January 2016 – St. Augustine, Florida

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International Cryptozoology Museum Conference – January 4th-6th, 2016
St. Augustine, Florida

 

Source: CryptoZooNews.com

Join us in Florida this winter. We proudly announce the International Cryptozoology Museum Conference, January 4-5-6, 2016, in America’s Oldest European-Settled City ~ St. Augustine, Florida.

The three-day event is a scientific cryptozoology conference being held near the site of the 1896 “Giant Octopus” beaching.

The conference will be a thoughtful experience for guests. Please sign up today (click here or see the individual options below).

The event will unfold over three days during Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday of the first full week of 2016. This takes place at the end of St. Augustine’s Festival of Lights. It is a beautiful, calm time of year in St. Augustine, Florida, with moderate temperatures and festive decorations still in place in this European appearing city.

ICM Conference 2016 | International Cryptozoology Museum

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International Cryptozoology Museum Conference – Facebook

International Cryptozoology Museum Conference – Facebook

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Chemtrails, Conspiracy, and the Radicalization of Political Discourse in America

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Chemtrails, Conspiracy, and the Radicalization of Political Discourse in America…

A House Divided: How a radical group of Republicans pushed Congress to the right.

By The Political Scene / December 14, 2015 Issue – New Yorker Magazine

How a group of radical conservatives ousted John Boehner—and pushed Congress to the right.

One of the working titles for the group was the Reasonable Nutjob Caucus. Credit Illustration by Matt Chase

“I used to spend ninety per cent of my constituent response time on people who call, e-mail, or send a letter, such as, ‘I really like this bill, H.R. 123,’ and they really believe in it because they heard about it through one of the groups that they belong to, but their view was based on actual legislation,” Nunes said. “Ten per cent were about ‘Chemtrails from airplanes are poisoning me’ to every other conspiracy theory that’s out there. And that has essentially flipped on its head.” The overwhelming majority of his constituent mail is now about the far-out ideas, and only a small portion is “based on something that is mostly true.” He added, “It’s dramatically changed politics and politicians, and what they’re doing.”

ninety-percent

Source: The War Inside the Republican Party

Archives – ParaPolitics

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Jacques Vallée does Reddit AMA (Ask Me Anything)

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I am Dr. Jacques Vallée a computer scientist and former astronomer. I have dedicated my personal research to the scientific research of UFOs. I was the model for the French scientist in Steven Spielberg’s “Close Encounters”. AMA!

Hi Reddit!

I’m excited to be here with you all today and to answer any questions you may have. Here is my proof: http://imgur.com/WxbXLoJ

Recently my investigations have focused on UFO sightings from ancient antiquity up to the Industrial Revolution – prior to the innovation of manmade vehicles for flight that can cause confusion when witnessing a UFO. I have worked with my colleague Chris Aubeck on my recent work and we will soon be publishing what we consider the new benchmark in UFO research – called Wonders in the Sky. Our larger goal is to set the groundwork for future researchers (Maybe that’s YOU) by identifying and conserving primary source documents. We want future researchers to continue UFO investigations as part of mainstream science.

I worked at the Institute for the Future, helping to develop the precursor to the internet, known as the Arpanet. You also may know me as the basis for the French scientist character in Steven Spielberg’s film Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Possibly you have seen one of my lectures (just click here and here for two videos); a panel about outer space at a global financial conference in Saudi Arabia and a TED talk in Geneva on Futures Research, respectively.

Looking forward to fielding your questions! AMA!

EDIT: Thanks Everybody for joining. My time is up. I have very much enjoyed answering your questions. Lots of really good ones.

EDIT: Noticed the video links didn’t stick as hyperlinks. Copying links below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4S98WGp … e=youtu.be

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lCeoNda … OwC-PcsGuq

EDIT: More can be learned about my current research on IndieGoGo: http://www.indiegogo.com/project/preview/7455b651

reddit.com

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Is Science Kind of a Scam?

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Is Science Kind of a Scam? NEW YORKER Magazine –

What makes science science? The pious answers are: its ceaseless curiosity in the face of mystery, its keen edge of experimental objectivity, its endless accumulation of new data, and the cool machines it uses. We stare, the scientists see; we gawk, they gaze. We guess; they know.

The defense of science against this claim turns out to be complicated, for the simple reason that, as a social activity, science is vulnerable to all the comedy inherent in any social activity: group thinking, self-pleasing, and running down the competition in order to get the customer’s (or, in this case, the government’s) cash. Books about the history of science should therefore be about both science and scientists, about the things they found and the way they found them. A good science writer has to show us the fallible men and women who made the theory, and then show us why, after the human foibles are boiled off, the theory remains reliable.

No well-tested scientific concept is more astonishing than the one that gives its name to a new book by the Scientific American contributing editor George Musser, “Spooky Action at a Distance” (Scientific American/Farrar, Straus & Giroux). The ostensible subject is the mechanics of quantum entanglement; the actual subject is the entanglement of its observers. Musser presents the hard-to-grasp physics of “non-locality,” and his question isn’t so much how this weird thing can be true as why, given that this weird thing had been known about for so long, so many scientists were so reluctant to confront it. What keeps a scientific truth from spreading?

The story dates to the early decades of quantum theory, in the nineteen-twenties and thirties, when Albert Einstein was holding out against the “probabilistic” views about the identity of particles and waves held by a younger generation of theoretical physicists. He created what he thought of as a reductio ad absurdum. Suppose, he said, that particles like photons and electrons really do act like waves, as the new interpretations insisted, and that, as they also insisted, their properties can be determined only as they are being measured. Then, he pointed out, something else would have to be true: particles that were part of a single wave function would be permanently “entangled,” no matter how far from each other they migrated. If you have a box full of photons governed by one wave function, and one escapes, the escapee remains entangled in the fate of the particles it left behind—like the outer edges of the ripples spreading from a pebble thrown into a pond. An entangled particle, measured here in the Milky Way, would have to show the same spin—or the opposite spin, depending—or momentum as its partner, conjoined millions of light-years away, when measured at the same time. Like Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel, no matter how far they spread apart they would still be helplessly conjoined. Einstein’s point was that such a phenomenon could only mean that the particles were somehow communicating with each other instantaneously, at a speed faster than light, violating the laws of nature. This was what he condemned as “spooky action at a distance.”

John Donne, thou shouldst be living at this hour! One can only imagine what the science-loving Metaphysical poet would have made of a metaphor that had two lovers spinning in unison no matter how far apart they were. But Musser has a nice, if less exalted, analogy for the event: it is as if two magic coins, flipped at different corners of the cosmos, always came up heads or tails together. (The spooky action takes place only in the context of simultaneous measurement. The particles share states, but they don’t send signals.)

What started out as a reductio ad absurdum became proof that the cosmos is in certain ways absurd. What began as a bug became a feature and is now a fact. Musser takes us into the lab of the Colgate professor Enrique Galvez, who has constructed a simple apparatus that allows him to entangle photons and then show that “the photons are behaving like a pair of magic coins. . . .They are not in contact, and no known force links them, yet they act as one.” With near-quantum serendipity, the publication of Musser’s book has coincided with news of another breakthrough experiment, in which scientists at Delft University measured two hundred and forty-five pairs of entangled electrons and confirmed the phenomenon with greater rigor than before. The certainty that spooky action at a distance takes place, Musser says, challenges the very notion of “locality,” our intuitive sense that some stuff happens only here, and some stuff over there. What’s happening isn’t really spooky action at a distance; it’s spooky distance, revealed through an action.

Why, then, did Einstein’s question get excluded for so long from reputable theoretical physics? The reasons, unfolding through generations of physicists, have several notable social aspects, worthy of Trollope’s studies of how private feuds affect public decisions. Musser tells us that fashion, temperament, zeitgeist, and sheer tenacity affected the debate, along with evidence and argument. The “indeterminacy” of the atom was, for younger European physicists, “a lesson of modernity, an antidote to a misplaced Enlightenment trust in reason, which German intellectuals in the 1920’s widely held responsible for their country’s defeat in the First World War.” The tonal and temperamental difference between the scientists was as great as the evidence they called on.

Musser tracks the action at the “Solvay” meetings, scientific conferences held at an institute in Brussels in the twenties. (Ernest Solvay was a rich Belgian chemist with a taste for high science.) Einstein and Niels Bohr met and argued over breakfast and dinner there, talking past each other more than to each other. Musser writes, “Bohr punted on Einstein’s central concern about links between distant locations in space,” preferring to focus on the disputes about probability and randomness in nature. As Musser says, the “indeterminacy” questions of whether what you measured was actually indefinite or just unknowable until you measured it was an important point, but not this important point.

Musser explains that the big issue was settled mainly by being pushed aside. Generational imperatives trumped evidentiary ones. The things that made Einstein the lovable genius of popular imagination were also the things that made him an easy object of condescension. The hot younger theorists patronized him, one of Bohr’s colleagues sneering that if a student had raised Einstein’s objections “I would have considered him quite intelligent and promising.”

There was never a decisive debate, never a hallowed crucial experiment, never even a winning argument to settle the case, with one physicist admitting, “Most physicists (including me) accept that Bohr won the debate, although like most physicists I am hard pressed to put into words just how it was done.” Arguing about non-locality went out of fashion, in this account, almost the way “Rock Around the Clock” displaced Sinatra from the top of the charts.

The same pattern of avoidance and talking-past and taking on the temper of the times turns up in the contemporary science that has returned to the possibility of non-locality. Musser notes that Geoffrey Chew’s attack on the notion of underlying laws in physics “was radical, and radicalism went over well in ’60’s-era Berkeley.” The British mathematician Roger Penrose’s assaults on string theory in the nineties were intriguing but too intemperate and too inconclusive for the room: “Penrose didn’t help his cause with his outspoken skepticism. . . . Valid though his critiques might have been, they weren’t calculated to endear him to his colleagues.”

Indeed, Musser, though committed to empirical explanation, suggests that the revival of “non-locality” as a topic in physics may be due to our finding the metaphor of non-locality ever more palatable: “Modern communications technology may not technically be non-local but it sure feels that it is.” Living among distant connections, where what happens in Bangalore happens in Boston, we are more receptive to the idea of such a strange order in the universe. Musser sums it up in an enviable aphorism: “If poetry is emotion recollected in tranquility, then science is tranquility recollected in emotion.” The seemingly neutral order of the natural world becomes the sounding board for every passionate feeling the physicist possesses.

 

READ THE REST at the…

Source: Is Science Kind of a Scam?

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Loren Coleman – The Twilight Language of Elm Street: Mason Road of JFK/King-Kill/33

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Loren Coleman – The Twilight Language of Elm Street: Mason Road of JFK/King-Kill/33

Dealey Plaza was the site of the first Masonic temple of Texas.
It also was the location of the killing of President John F. Kennedy.

First photo: Dealey Plaza in the aftermath of the assassination of President John F.Kennedy.

Second photo: Ike Altgens of the Associated Press’ photo of Jacqueline Kennedy and Secret Service agent Clint Hill climbing onto the back of the limo, against the site today. November 22, 1963.

The street pictured is Elm Street – the Mason Road of the synchromystic seekers. I first visited the street, Dealey Plaza, and the Texas School Depository Building in 1974, a mere 11 years after the JFK assassination. I’ve been back several times, as have thousands of others.

Fifty years ago today, on November 19, 1963, The Dallas Times Herald detailed the exact route of the presidential motorcade. It showed the President would be going down Elm Street.

1, 2, 3…at 12:30 on 11.22.63.
How did synchromysticism’s Godfather view the JFK assassinaiton?

King-Kill/33: Masonic Symbolism in the Assassination of John F. Kennedy by James Shelby Downard was published (after years of making the rounds in rough copies and on tape) by Adam Parfrey, in the first edition of Apocalypse Culture. The essay theorizes the Freemasons were responsible for the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

Part of the theorizing considers the special location of the “ritual killing” of the “King.”

 

READ THE REST at the…

Source: Twilight Language: Elm Street: The Mason Road of JFK/King-Kill/33

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Twin Peaks Director David Lynch’s Foundation to Fund Meditation Training for Rio’s Elite Police

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Rio de Janeiro (AFP) – A group of 400 elite police officers in Rio de Janeiro, host of next year’s Olympic Games, will take meditation classes to help deal with the stress of the job.

If it proves helpful the program will be extended to all officers, chief of staff of the military police in Rio, Colonel Robson Rodrigues, was quoted saying in the Folha de Sao Paulo newspaper Saturday.

“A policeman that is less stressed will fire less during an operation,” he said.

Less than a year away from the Olympics, security remains a major challenge in Rio.

Elite Brazilian police training with French instructors to protect the Olympics said this week they fear an attempted terrorist attack similar to the bloodshed in Paris and are working hard to be ready.

Folha de Sao Paulo said the courses will be funded by the David Lynch Foundation.

The organization’s founder Lynch directed films including “Mulholland Drive” and the hit television series “Twin Peaks”.

Source: Hum with guns: Rio’s elite police meditate for peace of mind

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DIA Declassified: Agency’s interest in “psychoenergetics,” ESP, telepathy, and remote viewing

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Defense Intelligence Agency headquarters at Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling in Washington, D.C.

DIA Declassified: A Sourcebook

Web Posting Spotlights 50+ Year History of Secretive Defense Intelligence Agency

New Documents Feature Iraqi Defector “CURVEBALL,” Convicted Cuba Spy Ana Belen Montes, Analysis of Iraqi and Chinese WMD programs, and Brief Experiments with “Psychoenergetics”

National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book #534

Edited by Jeffrey T. Richelson

November 20, 2015

For more information, contact: 202-994-7000 or nsarchiv@gwu.edu

Washington, D.C., November 20, 2015 – The Defense Intelligence Agency, established in 1961, is one of the United States government’s largest intelligence organizations – employing 17,000 individuals, including thousands stationed overseas. Its 2013 fiscal year budget request was for $3.15 billion. Yet, the DIA is also one of the more secretive agencies in the U.S. intelligence community, regularly denying access to basic information about its structure, functions and activities. Today the National Security Archive posts a new sourcebook of over 50 documents, many appearing for the first time, that help to illuminate the DIA’s five-decades-long history.

Highlights of the posting include an internal memo about the infamous Iraqi defector known as CURVEBALL and the false intelligence he provided about Iraq’s supposed WMD programs; a 180-page review of the case of DIA analyst Ana Belen Montes, convicted of supplying secrets to the Cubans several analyses of Iraqi and Chinese weapons of mass destruction programs; and descriptions of DIA’s interest in “psychoenergetics” activities such as extrasensory perception, telepathy, and remote viewing.

Today’s posting also features dozens of issues of the DIA’s in-house publication, Communiqué (see sidebar), containing significant information about the agency that is routinely withheld from the public under the Freedom of Information Act.

The documents posted today concern:

  • The creation of DIA (Documents 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6).
  • Early CIA-DIA relations (Documents 8, 9, 10).
  • DIA’s role in the Cuban Missile Crisis (Document 44) and the Vietnam War (Document 46).
  • DIA’s 1978 intelligence appraisal of the Shah’s future (Document 14).
  • DIA studies on Chinese nuclear weapons programs (Document 13, Document 17).
  • DIA studies on locating Iraq’s short-range missiles during the first Gulf War (Document 24), its acquisition of aluminum tubes (Document 31), and its “reemerging” nuclear weapons program (Document 33).
  • DIA director Lowell Jacoby’s summary of the CURVEBALL case (Document 36).
  • DIA’s “psychoenergetics” activities (Document 18, Document 21).
  • The DoD Inspector General report on the case of Ana Belen Montes, who served as long-time agent of the Cuban intelligence service (Document 37).

DIA DECLASSIFIED

by Jeffrey T. Richelson

Along with the national intelligence agencies (the Central Intelligence Agency, the National Security Agency, the National Reconnaissance Office, and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency), the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) is one of the largest United States government intelligence organizations. It employs approximately 17,000 individuals, with thousands deployed overseas. Its fiscal year 2013 budget request was for $3.15 billion dollars.[1]

Some of the intellectual work that led to its creation took place during the later years of the Dwight Eisenhower administration (although it appears Eisenhower was interested in moving toward creation of such an agency as early as 1953). In 1959, the United States Intelligence Board created a Joint Study Group (JSG), chaired by the CIA’s Lyman Kirkpatrick, to study the intelligence-producing agencies. The group concluded that there was considerable overlap and duplication in defense intelligence activities, resulting in an inefficient distribution of resources. It observed that “… the fragmentation of efforts creates ‘barriers’ to the free and complete interchange of intelligence information among the several components of the Department of Defense” and recommended that the Secretary of Defense “bring the military intelligence organization within the Department of Defense into full consonance with the concept of the Defense Reorganization Act of 1958.”[2]

However, as the end of Eisenhower’s tenure as president approached there was no concrete plan to establish a DoD-level intelligence agency. As a result, in an early January 1961 meeting of the National Security Council, Eisenhower was reported to have observed (Document 1, p. 4) that “each Military Service developed its own intelligence organization,” [that] “this situation made little sense in managerial terms” and that “he had suffered an eight year defeat on this question.” As a result, he “would leave a legacy of ashes for his successor.”

Read  more at …

Source: DIA Declassified

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Was Ripon school gripped by mass psychogenic illness?

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A young woman faints during a Menudo concert at Madison Square Garden, New York City. Photograph: New York Daily News/Getty Images

What doctors used to call mass hysteria usually occurs among close-knit groups as anxiety weaves its way through, causing physical symptoms

On 15 February 1787, a young woman at a Lancashire cotton mill decided to scare one of her co-workers with a mouse. The prank made medical history. Terrified of the rodent, the woman on the receiving end had a fit that lasted hours. The next day, three more workers suffered violent fits. The day after, six more.

Alarmed and mystified at the epidemic, the owners closed the mill amid rumours of a disease brought in by contaminated cotton. When Dr William St Clare arrived from Preston to investigate, he found 24 people affected. Three worked at another factory five miles down the road. He ended the epidemic swiftly. It was “merely nervous, easily cured, and not introduced by the cotton,” he concluded. Suitably reassured, all recovered and no more workers fell ill.

On Wednesday, more than two centuries later, and 65 miles up the A59 from Lancashire, 40 pupils at the Outwood academy in Ripon had treatment for dizziness and nausea after four fainted in an Armistice Day service. Fire brigade specialists dispatched to the incident found no signs of hazardous materials,but the assembly hall was warm. David Winspear of the North Yorkshire fire service suspects that a handful of children fainted, with the rest developing symptoms driven by anxiety that rippled through the school. One student talked of a “domino effect”.

Source: Was Ripon school gripped by mass psychogenic illness? | Science | The Guardian

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Event: Stephen Usher on Rudolf Steiner – Tuesday, Nov. 17th

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INACS (Institute for Neuroscience And Consciousness Study)
& Anomaly Archives Present…

rudolf-steinerRudolf Steiner Western Initiate: Practical Accomplishments & How He Did It!
A Presentation by Stephen E. Usher, Ph.D.
Tuesday, November 17, 2015, 6:30–9 p.m.
Unity Center Austin (map)
Please RSVP at Meetup.com to reserve a seat and view Upcoming Events!
Open to the public. $5-10 non-member donation appreciated.
Become a member today at http://inacs.org/membership!

Rudolf Steiner (1861-1925) was arguably the greatest creative genius of the 20th Century. He created the Waldorf School movement, which is one of the largest private school movements in the world with over 1000 schools worldwide; he created Biodynamic Agriculture, which was the first alternative agricultural movement with 1000s of acres under cultivation and Demeter certified foods particularly in Europe; he created anthroposophically extended western medicine with hospitals, pharmaceuticals, and 1000s of MD’s practicing around the world; he created a unique school of architecture best known for the Goetheanum, a concrete building in Switzerland; he created the movement art of Eurythmy; and he attempted to restructure Central Europe after World War I with his Threefold Social Order. Hitler attacked Steiner in print in 1921 and the early Nazis tried to kill him in 1922 when he lectured in Munich.

His collected works number over 350 volumes. A well known intellectual of his day, he was given the task at age 22 of editing the scientific writings of Goethe for the first complete edition of Goethe’s works. Steiner’s development of a Science of the Spirit to complement Natural Science based on precisely “schooled clairvoyance” led to a great deal of controversy during his life and continues to do so today.

At the request of Stephen Usher in 1983, Nobel laureate Saul Bellow wrote a foreword to Steiner’s Boundaries of Natural Science, which was published by the Anthroposophic Press. Joseph Beuys’ untimely death in 1986 prevented him from writing an agreed upon foreword to a volume of Steiner’s social thought.

StephenEUsherStephen E. Usher received an MA in mathematics and a PhD in economics from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. He served on the research staff of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York (1978-1980) where he attended meetings with Paul Volcker. He took over the management of the Anthroposophic Press (publisher of Steiner in the US) in 1980 and continued in that position until 1988 when he joined an international economic consulting firm. In 1999 Mr. Usher became an independent economic consultant. Today he spends his time writing and lecturing about Rudolf Steiner.

Source: INACS » Blog Archive » Stephen Usher on Rudolf Steiner: How He Did It

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Ripper was popular singer Michael Maybrick – ‘a psychopath shielded by servants of the (Masonic) state’

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Michael Maybrick photographed in 1907  Photo: Courtesy of Fourth Estate

After 15 years of research, the director of Withnail and I believes he has cracked the most enduring mystery in British criminal history

“…the man in charge of the investigation, the Metropolitan Police Commissioner, Sir Charles Warren.

Jack the Ripper was not, as popular mythology would have it, a fiend or a criminal genius. ‘He was a psychopath shielded by servants of the Victorian state.’ More specifically, shielded by the fraternal bonds of Freemasonry. As much as it is about uncovering the identity of the Ripper, They All Love Jack is a scalding critique of the hypocrisy at the heart of the establishment in Victorian England, and the role played in it by Freemasonry. ‘It was endemic in the way England ran itself,’ Robinson says. ‘At the time of Jack the Ripper, there were something like 360 Tory MPs, 330 of which I can identify as Masons. The whole of the ruling class was Masonic, from the heir to the throne [Edward, Prince of Wales] down. It was part of being in the club.’

Warren was an important cog in the Masonic wheel. He was a founder member of the Quatuor Coronati lodge, and an authority on Freemasonic history and ritual. As a young man he led an expedition to the Holy Land in 1867, where he excavated under the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. But not only was Warren a Freemason. So too was Jack the Ripper.

Robinson’s theory, argued with a forensic attention to detail, is that all of the killings bore the unmistakable stamp of being perversions of Freemasonic ritual: the symbol of a pair of compasses, ‘the trademark of Freemasonry’, carved into the face of Catherine Eddowes; removal of meal buttons and coins from the bodies of Eddowes and Annie Chapman – ‘The removal of metal is axiomatic in Masonic ritual,’ Robinson writes, money being ‘an emblem of vice’… all of these things and more were not feverish acts of madness but carefully laid clues, the Ripper’s calling card, in what he called his ‘funny little game’ – a gruesome paperchase designed to taunt the authorities, and Charles Warren in particular. The cryptic graffiti in Goulston Street was ‘the most flagrant clue of all.’

As a Masonic scholar, Warren would have been ‘better acquainted with the story of the Three Ruffians than any other man on earth’; he would certainly have recognised that the word ‘Juwes’ was not a misspelling of ‘Jews’, but a pun on Jubela, Jubelo and Jubelum. The graffiti was not anti-Semitic, but a message from the killer to Charles Warren that the Ripper was a brother Freemason.

Warren knew what Jack the Ripper was – ‘I’m 1,000 per cent certain of that,’ Robinson says – if not who he was. And others knew it too – the information shared on a ‘need-to-know basis’. The man that Warren appointed to be his ‘eyes and ears’ on the case, Chief Inspector Donald Swanson, was also a Freemason. So were at least two of the coroners, Wynne Baxter and Henry Crawford, who ruled on the murders; and at least three of the police doctors who examined the bodies.

Robinson is not the first person to go down the Freemasonry road. In 1976, in his book Jack the Ripper: the Final Solution, Stephen Knight advanced the theory that Albert Victor, the Duke of Clarence, an eminent Freemason, was the Ripper. Masonic historians were among the first to shoot the theory down. And Robinson agrees. Albert was a buffoon and a degenerate but he was not the Ripper. But in throwing out Albert, Robinson maintains, what he calls ‘Freemasology’ was also attempting to ‘inoculate’ against any further attempt to propose a Freemason as the Ripper – ‘the Masonic baby duly disappearing with the royal bathwater’. But the fact that the Duke of Clarence wasn’t the Ripper, doesn’t mean the Ripper wasn’t a Freemason. ‘He was,’ Robinson says.

Michael Maybrick, Robinson’s ‘candidate’  Photo: Courtesy of Fourth Estate

Michael Maybrick was a hugely popular singer and composer in the Victorian era, who is virtually forgotten today – for reasons that Robinson believes are no accident. He was particularly well known for his sentimental seafaring songs, written under the pen name Stephen Adams, among them Nancy Lee, the sheet music of which sold more than 100,000 copies in two years, and – ironically – They All Love Jack, which was written in 1887, the year before the Ripper killings began. His composition The Holy City sold more than one million copies, making it the best-selling song of the 19th century. Both Vera Lynn and Charlotte Church have recorded versions of the song.

Maybrick was close friends with Sir Arthur Sullivan and the painter Frederick Leighton, among many other prominent public figures. Both Sullivan and Leighton were Freemasons, as was Michael Maybrick. He was a member of no fewer than six Masonic lodges or chapters, and was on the Supreme Grand Council of Freemasons, whose members also included the Prince of Wales. He and Charles Warren were in different lodges, but both were members of the Savage Club. Robinson is ‘100 per cent sure’ they would have met.

Source: Jack the Ripper: has Withnail and I director Bruce Robinson solved the world’s most famous crime? – Telegraph

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