Strieber, Whitley

Whitley Strieber

Louis Whitley Strieber (/ˈstrbər/; born June 13, 1945) is an American writer best known for his horror novels The Wolfen and The Hunger and for Communion, a non-fiction account of his alleged experiences with non-human entities. He has maintained a dual career of author of fiction and advocate of alternative concepts through his best-selling non-fiction books, his Unknown Country website, and his internet podcast, Dreamland.

Whitley Strieber
WhitleyAnne3.jpg

Author Whitley Strieber and Ann Strieber, lecturing to MUFON
Born Louis Whitley Strieber
June 13, 1945 (age 69)
San Antonio, Texas, United States
Occupation Writer/novelist
Nationality American
Period 1978–present
Genre Social science fiction, Ufology, Horror novels
Notable works The Wolfen (1978)
The Hunger (1981)
Communion (1987)
Spouse Anne Strieber
Website
www.unknowncountry.com

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whitley_Strieber

 

strieber-whitley-by-dennis-stacy
Whitley Strieber. (DENNIS STACY/FORTEAN PICTURE LIBRARY)

 

Books by Whitley Strieber

  • Breakthrough: The Next Step, Strieber,  Whitley, 0-06-017653-9, HarperCollins, Hardcover, June 1995, 4, , Religion & Spirituality : New Age : General, $1.03, From Publishers Weekly, Bestselling UFO author and horror novelist Strieber (Communion,  Transformation) here recounts his purported ongoing series of alien contacts over the past few years. Abducted in 1987 from his upstate New York cabin by a visitor,  Strieber is taken by UFO to Boulder,  Colo.,  where he holds down his friend Dora Ruffner while her small daughter has her spine hammered by an insectoid alien. In 1993,  a male humanoid visitor in a white tunic takes up residence with Strieber and his wife,  imparting a sense of peace and joy. In other encounters,  Strieber takes a jeep ride with a boy and ends up in an alternate universe; the visitors stage a journey through Eden; the author slips through the floorboards to enter the body of a human stranger. The aliens’ contact with him?and with independent witnesses or contactees cited here?is cloaked in the symbolism of myth,  folklore and spirituality. By this account,  many who have written to Strieber divulging their UFO-related experiences report meetings with dead relatives. Without giving names or sources,  Strieber also describes his involvement in a secret congressional UFO investigation. Fans will be captivated; others will be skeptical or wonder what it all means. , Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information,  Inc. , , From Library Journal, Strieber continues the saga of his encounter with extraterrestrials., Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information,  Inc., , ,
  • Breakthrough: The Next Step, Strieber,  Whitley, 0-06-100958-X, Harper Mass Market Paperbacks, Mass Market Paperback, June 1996, 4, , Religion & Spirituality : New Age : General, $0.01, From Publishers Weekly, Bestselling UFO author and horror novelist Strieber (Communion,  Transformation) here recounts his purported ongoing series of alien contacts over the past few years. Abducted in 1987 from his upstate New York cabin by a visitor,  Strieber is taken by UFO to Boulder,  Colo.,  where he holds down his friend Dora Ruffner while her small daughter has her spine hammered by an insectoid alien. In 1993,  a male humanoid visitor in a white tunic takes up residence with Strieber and his wife,  imparting a sense of peace and joy. In other encounters,  Strieber takes a jeep ride with a boy and ends up in an alternate universe; the visitors stage a journey through Eden; the author slips through the floorboards to enter the body of a human stranger. The aliens’ contact with him?and with independent witnesses or contactees cited here?is cloaked in the symbolism of myth,  folklore and spirituality. By this account,  many who have written to Strieber divulging their UFO-related experiences report meetings with dead relatives. Without giving names or sources,  Strieber also describes his involvement in a secret congressional UFO investigation. Fans will be captivated; others will be skeptical or wonder what it all means. , Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information,  Inc. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. , , From Library Journal, Strieber continues the saga of his encounter with extraterrestrials., Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information,  Inc. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title., , ,
  • Communion : A True Story, Strieber,  Whitley, 0-380-70388-2, Avon, Mass Market Paperback, April 1995, 3, , Religion & Spirituality : New Age : General, $7.99, From School Library Journal, YA Strieber has a reputation for writing well-researched nonfiction. Were it not for this reputation,  readers would be more tempted to dismiss as fantasy this account of visits he has received from a non-human group. In the winter of 198586,  the visits became both more frequent and more visible. Strieber sought the help of a counselor/hypnotist,  who did not accept the alien hypothesis. Eventually Strieber’s wife was also hypnotized. The accounts both Striebers gave under hypnosis and the memories that surfaced after hynosis,  as well as several witnesses to aspects of the visitations all corroborate that something abnormal occurred. Strieber is careful not to jump to any conclusions; in fact,  he philosophizes at length about the possibilities which include aliens,  an as yet unidentified aspect of the human mind,  or some generally invisible earth inhabitant such as fairies. The book is fascinating as long as it sticks to the basic account,  and the ways in which the Striebers chose to research the phenomena. The passages of hypothesizing are more longwinded and will be of less interest to young adults,  but they do remind readers that the Striebers have not accepted a single answer to the puzzle even now. Any readers who have interest in the unexplained will appreciate this book. Dorcas Hand,  Episcopal High School,  Bellaire, Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information,  Inc. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. , , Book Description, , , On December 26,  1985,  at a secluded cabin in upstate New York,  Whitley Strieber went siding with his wife and son,  ate Christmas dinner leftovers,  and went to bed early., , Six hours later,  he found himself suddenly awake…and forever changed., , Thus begins the most astonishing true-life odyssey ever recorded — one man’s riveting account of his extraordinary experiences with visitors fromelsewhere… how they found him,  where they took him,  what they did to him and why…, , Believe it. Or don’t… read more, , ,
  • Majestic, Strieber,  Whitley, 0-425-12295-6, Berkley Pub Group, Paperback, October 1990, 1, , Fiction, $0.01, From Publishers Weekly, Strieber,  author of Communion and Transformation ,  continues to write on the implications of UFO sightings in this novel,  a blend of fact and fiction. Working on a tip from an ex-CIA agent,  reporter Nicholas Duke investigates a decades-long cover-up of a 1947 spaceship crash,  in what PW termed a very long,  sensationalized story. , Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information,  Inc., , ,
  • Majestic, Strieber,  Whitley, 0-399-13469-7, Putnam Pub Group, Hardcover, September 1989, 1, , Fiction, $0.25, From Publishers Weekly, Strieber,  author of Communion and Transformation ,  continues to write on the implications of UFO sightings in his new novel,  a blend of fact and fiction. In 1989,  ex-CIA agent Wilfred Stone entrusts his story and secret papers on a decades-long coverup to reporter Nicholas Duke. Will confesses his part in the conspiracy demanded by President Truman and the nation’s combined intelligence agencies in 1947,  when a spacecraft crashed near Rosell (N.M.) Army Base. Many people witnessed the event and swore to finding bodies of extraterrestrial victims and other phenomena at the site. The accounts were,  however,  officially debunked,  as all similar phenomena have been. That’s the gist of Strieber’s very long,  sensationalized story,  which may create more dissension rather than believers in the mysterious sightings recorded since the 19th century. If Strieber’s book proves anything,  it’s that the public is entitled to honest information on foo-flights and their implications. Preferred Choice selection; Troll Book Club alternate. , Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information,  Inc., , ,
  • Majestic, Strieber,  Whitley, 0-671-69342-5, Simon & Schuster (Audio), Audio Cassette, December 1989, 1, , Audiocassettes : Literature & Fiction : General, $3.99, From Publishers Weekly, Strieber,  author of Communion and Transformation ,  continues to write on the implications of UFO sightings in this novel,  a blend of fact and fiction. Working on a tip from an ex-CIA agent,  reporter Nicholas Duke investigates a decades-long cover-up of a 1947 spaceship crash,  in what PW termed a very long,  sensationalized story. , Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information,  Inc. –This text refers to the  Paperback edition., , ,
  • Nature’s End: The Consequences of the Twentieth Century, Strieber,  Whitley, 0-446-51344-X, Warner Books, Hardcover, April 1986, 1, , Science Fiction & Fantasy : Science Fiction : General, $1.23, From Publishers Weekly, Carr’s (The Return of the Gypsy sizable audience will be satisfied by her newest historical romance. As young Victoria is crowned in London,  Annora Cadorson lives in lore-ridden romantic Cornwall. From the ancient manor of Cador,  Annora witnesses some of the barbaric pre-Christian ritual of Midsummer’s Eve,  which the locals celebrate with ordeal by fire. She is shattered by her suspicion that one of the masked participants may be the neighboring lord,  who has won her love but,  she fears,  might be covetous of her estates. When Annora’s parents return to Australia to oversee family affairs,  she postpones her London season to accompany them to the outback. Amidst this geographical expanse Annora holds center stage as narrator,  somewhat reducing the novel’s immediacy. Doubleday Book Club alternate. , Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information,  Inc. , , From School Library Journal, YA As in Warday (Holt,  1984),  Strieber and Kunetka combine scientific facts with projections of scientific probability in their speculative fiction of the near future. It is 2025 and the planet is rapidly approaching environmental death. Dr. Gupta Singh,  a Hindu guru with a Jim Jones-like following,  has proposed the suicide,  by lottery,  of one-third of the world’s population. His followers have elected a Depopulationist majority in Congress. Led by journalist John Sinclair,  a small group hopes… read more, , ,
  • The Secret School: Preparation for Contact, Strieber,  Whitley, 0-06-018731-X, HarperCollins, Hardcover, January 1997, 4, , Religion & Spirituality : New Age : General, $3.95, From Publishers Weekly, With this new volume of recovered memories and apocalyptic predictions,  Strieber continues the journey he began with Communion,  his extraordinarily successful account of alien abduction. While that book was largely about his experiences with the visitors,  the follow-up books,  Transformation and Breakthrough,  were more concerned with the spiritual implications of alien contact. Strieber now takes this process even further,  into prophecy and New Age rumination. He contends that,  as a child in San Antonio in the 1950s,  he and other children were taken in the middle of the night to a secret school run by aliens in the middle of San Antonio’s wild Olmos Basin. The book is structured as a series of lessons,  mostly specific memories of his ninth summer,  followed by commentaries,  a series of vague and increasingly wild speculations and predictions. Most of the spiritual content here is a farrago of nearly every New Age preoccupation imaginable?aliens,  reincarnation,  time travel,  millennial disaster,  Atlantis,  etc.?proved by highly credulous readings of popular science articles. As the author of entertaining and elegantly composed narratives about personal contact with mysterious entities that are unsupported by proof and that purvey a maddeningly vague message of spiritual release,  Strieber has become the Carlos Castaneda of the 1990s. Even those who don’t believe a word of what he’s saying will enjoy his writing?about his Texas boyhood in particular?and his ability to conjure a sense of terror,  awe and wonderment. , Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information,  Inc. , , From Library Journal, A prequel to Streiber’s tales of alien abduction., Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information,  Inc., , ,
  • The Secret School: Preparation for Contact [ABRIDGED], Strieber,  Whitley, 0-694-51800-X, HarperAudio, Audio Cassette, January 1997, 1, , Audiocassettes : Nonfiction : General, $1.99, From Publishers Weekly, With this new volume of recovered memories and apocalyptic predictions,  Strieber continues the journey he began with Communion,  his extraordinarily successful account of alien abduction. While that book was largely about his experiences with the visitors,  the follow-up books,  Transformation and Breakthrough,  were more concerned with the spiritual implications of alien contact. Strieber now takes this process even further,  into prophecy and New Age rumination. He contends that,  as a child in San Antonio in the 1950s,  he and other children were taken in the middle of the night to a secret school run by aliens in the middle of San Antonio’s wild Olmos Basin. The book is structured as a series of lessons,  mostly specific memories of his ninth summer,  followed by commentaries,  a series of vague and increasingly wild speculations and predictions. Most of the spiritual content here is a farrago of nearly every New Age preoccupation imaginable?aliens,  reincarnation,  time travel,  millennial disaster,  Atlantis,  etc.?proved by highly credulous readings of popular science articles. As the author of entertaining and elegantly composed narratives about personal contact with mysterious entities that are unsupported by proof and that purvey a maddeningly vague message of spiritual release,  Strieber has become the Carlos Castaneda of the 1990s. Even those who don’t believe a word of what he’s saying will enjoy his writing?about his Texas boyhood in particular?and his ability to conjure a sense of terror,  awe and wonderment. , Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information,  Inc. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. , , From Library Journal, A prequel to Streiber’s tales of alien abduction., Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information,  Inc. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title., , ,
  • The Wild, Strieber,  Whitley, 0-8125-1277-4, Tor Books, Paperback, March 1991, 1, , American Science Fiction And Fantasy, $7.00, Editorial Reviews, Product Description, When Bob Duke turns into a wolf and begins to roam the streets  of Manhattan,  his wife and son vow to find him and restore his  humanity. By the author of The Wolfen and Communion.  Reissue., , ,
  • The Wolfen, Strieber,  Whitley, 0-553-17004-X, Bantam, Mass Market Paperback, 1979, 1, , , $2.86, , , ,
  • Transformation: The Breakthrough, Strieber,  Whitley, , , , , 1, , , , , , ,
  • Transformation: The Breakthrough, Strieber,  Whitley, 0-380-70535-4, Avon, Paperback, January 1997, 1, , Fiction, $0.01, Ingram, According to bestselling author Whitley Strieber,  his contact with strange aliens did not end with the release of his controversial book,  Communion. Instead,  the visitors kept coming. In Transformation,  Strieber challenges his own fear for a triumphant breakthrough in understanding. Soon to be a movie. HC: Morrow. (Nonfiction)., , ,
  • Transformation: The Breakthrough, Strieber,  Whitley, , William Morrow, Hardcover, September 1988, 1, , Religion & Spirituality : New Age : General, $0.01, Avg. Customer Review:, , ,
  • Unholy Fire, Strieber,  Whitley, 0-451-17496-8, Signet, Paperback, February 1,  1993, 1, , Modern fiction, $0.79, Editorial Reviews, From Publishers Weekly, Weak and whining priests fight off a chillingly omnipotent demon in Strieber’s often moronic tale of Satanic possession in New York City. , Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information,  Inc.        , , From Kirkus Reviews, Of all the predators that have stalked Strieber’s bestselling horror (Billy,  Communion,  etc.),  none match for sheer exuberant evil the dark star of this resonant novel–a rip-roaring,  fire- snorting demon infesting the soul of a Greenwich Village priest. But which priest harbors the demon? Kindly old John Rafferty,  beloved pastor of Mary and Joseph church? His young assistant,  Frank Bayley? Or ancient Tom Zimmer,  mute for five years? A routine question,  that,  to drive the fast-moving plot,  but one fueled by issues of faith and corruption–beginning with the enthralling opening chapters,  which find Father John’s vow of celibacy teetering under the seductive push of lovely young parishioner Maria Julien. Succumbing to Maria’s kisses,  John goes to her apartment…and the story leaps hours ahead,  with Maria crowing “The cherry is pitted” to–Fr. Frank. He too,  it seems,  is under Maria’s spell–and that of her leathers and whips. But that night,  a vile,  capering,  nonsense-spewing entity–seen here,  as throughout,  in artful half-light–strangles Maria in the church. And over the next days,  several more die gruesome deaths–two burned alive–even as the media uncover John’s affection for Maria,  and as the Holy See,  shuddering at the scandal,  puts Frank in John’s place as pastor. In the meantime,  a winsome female cop investigates the killings–and is attacked by the demon in her apartment–while old Fr. Tom shambles about in the wee hours. One priest is roasted,  a second is unmasked,  and a third must pit his shaky faith against the gibbering demon in an extended showdown that jumps and gyrates with evil energy. Any novel of demonic possession must bear comparison to The Exorcist–and Strieber’s holds its own,  with brilliantly realized characters,  fascinating Church intrigue,  and plenty of prose- dazzle,  if not quite the shock and slam that made the Blatty so unforgettable. — Copyright ©1991,  Kirkus Associates,  LP. All rights reserved.  –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title., , ,
  • Warday, Strieber,  Whitley, 0-446-32630-5, Warner Books,  Incorporated, Mass Market Paperback, April 1985, 1, , Fiction – General, $0.01, , , ,
  • Warday (Bookcassette(r) Edition) [UNABRIDGED], Strieber,  Whitley, 0-930435-09-5, Bookcassette Sales, Audio Cassette, March 1985, 1, , Audiocassettes : Literature & Fiction : General, $19.99, , , ,
  • The Communion Letters, Strieber,  Whitley (Editor), , Harper Prism, Paperback, December 1997, 1, , Religion & Spirituality : New Age : General, $7.95, Book Description, They are called Others,  Visitors,  Grays,  Friends or Strangers.No one knows who or what they are.But due to the intense investigations of the past few years,  resulting from the publication of the controversial bestseller Communion,   their reality is no longer a question., , These letters,  often awkward,  sometimes incredulous and always searingly honest,  document the fact that hundreds of thousands have experienced the Communion  phenomena: childhood visitations,  the nine knocks,  mysterious scars and implants,  abductions,  sexual encounters and black sedans., , It’s all here.Unvarnished and irrefutable.Assembled for the first time,  these letters lead us to the heart of the greatest mystery of our age.For it is in these authentic personal encounters of ordinary men and women that we come closest to the truth about who They are and what They want with us.In the dramatic words of Whitley Strieber,  these letters report — a courtship.  , , Ingram, One million people who have experienced alien encounters have written to the New York Times bestselling author of Communion,  The Hunger,  Warday,  and other thrilling books. Now,  in The Communion Letters,  Strieber presents a fascinating selection of this vast and compelling correspondence Targeted print ads., , ,
  • The Communion Letters, Strieber,  Whitley (Editor), 0-06-105368-6, Harper Prism, Paperback, December 1997, 1, , Religion & Spirituality : New Age : General, $7.95, Book Description, They are called Others,  Visitors,  Grays,  Friends or Strangers.No one knows who or what they are.But due to the intense investigations of the past few years,  resulting from the publication of the controversial bestseller Communion,   their reality is no longer a question., , These letters,  often awkward,  sometimes incredulous and always searingly honest,  document the fact that hundreds of thousands have experienced the Communion  phenomena: childhood visitations,  the nine knocks,  mysterious scars and implants,  abductions,  sexual encounters and black sedans., , It’s all here.Unvarnished and irrefutable.Assembled for the first time,  these letters lead us to the heart of the greatest mystery of our age.For it is in these authentic personal encounters of ordinary men and women that we come closest to the truth about who They are and what They want with us.In the dramatic words of Whitley Strieber,  these letters report — a courtship.  , , Ingram, One million people who have experienced alien encounters have written to the New York Times bestselling author of Communion,  The Hunger,  Warday,  and other thrilling books. Now,  in The Communion Letters,  Strieber presents a fascinating selection of this vast and compelling correspondence Targeted print ads., , ,
  • Whitley Strieber’s Aliens, Strieber,  Whitley (Editor), 0-671-88597-9, Pocket Books, Mass Market Paperback, January 1999, 1, , Horror : Anthologies, $6.99, Avg. Customer Review:, , ,
  • Confirmation: The Hard Evidence of Aliens Among Us, Whitley Strieber, 0-312-18557-X, St. Martin’s Press, Hardcover, May 1998, 3, , Religion & Spirituality : New Age : General, $23.95, Amazon.com, In his 10 years of experience as a publicly recognized close-encounter witness,  Whitley Strieber has labored to lift the veils of skepticism and denial from scientists,  politicians,  and reporters. He’s appreciated a climate of increasing open-mindedness,  noting also that any hard evidence confirming the existence of UFOs,  close encounters,  and alien abductions has been,  to date,  lacking. But times,  he writes in Confirmation,  have changed. Gone are the arguments that science has nothing to work with. Behavioral science has not only the witnesses but also physical proof that something unknown has happened to at least some of them,  in the form of apparent implants that have been removed from their bodies. Further,  fantastic advances are enabling false alien-abduction stories to be weeded out the from the true ones. But it reads like a stew of bold assertions tagged onto eyewitness accounts,  the truth of which remains largely anecdotal,  and mixed in with a discussion of new theories about false-memory syndrome. Confirmation might rally the believers,  but it will make the unconverted skeptical and querulous. , , Whitley Strieber has never suggested that the alien presence among us is benign,  and his confessions and investigations have always been unnerving. Sinister,  secret,  and bizarre are words he uses to describe them. Strieber’s evidence that there are aliens among us falls into three areas: an increase in amateur videotapes of strange objects in the sky; the massive amount of abduction testimony that is different from older accounts; and the insidious implants that have been removed from close-encounter witnesses (of which he is one). This last area is creepy,  indeed,  and we can be glad that science is conducting careful studies. What the implants are made of,  how they function,  and what their purpose might be–these questions hold the key to Strieber’s mystery. , , His reporting of the facts begins on July 11,  1991,  in Mexico City during a total eclipse of the sun. A UFO was spotted and videotaped by hundreds. Exhaustively he argues against the variables–it can be,  for example,  neither Venus nor a star. He recounts the heated public debates and asserts that this 1991 event was not isolated,  but heralded an extended period of sightings. Of course,  he admits,  hoaxes abounded,  too. , , When it comes to discussing the three videos that have actually appeared on TV depicting aliens,  Strieber’s extrapolations do not harden to proof. Yet he begins part 2 of Confirmation with this assertion: The evidence that UFOs are flying around in our skies is so extensive that it is reasonable to consider that these unconventional objects are in some way real,  and that many of them seem to be under intelligent control. This part of the book (it’s livelier than the first part,  because it’s even creepier) presents testimony of actual encounters. These narratives came to him in letter form and his approach is to discern common threads among wildly diverse experiences. Rejecting psychological explanations for alleged abductions,  Strieber pounces on what he thinks of as the reliable source–the natural memories of people who have had continuous recall of their experiences from the time they happened. Now,  when was the last time you trusted your memory as a reliable source? But Strieber believes without a doubt that we are receiving communication from another world. Describing the strange and chilling world of the abduction letters,  he’s convinced that they indicate the working of a nonhuman mind,  or of a part of the human mind so hidden that it has never before gained a voice. So is it Close Encounters or psychosis? , , Unfortunately,  with every extrapolation or assertion,  Whitley Strieber’s arguments seem more and more strained; the proof remains,  alas,  poofy,  as when he compares the increasingly elaborate abduction narratives to those of crop circles–another documented but unexplained mystery–citing elaboration itself as proof of increasingly different abductions. Since the first sightings,  crop circles,  too,  have gr, , ,

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