Dowsing

Dowsing – 

A dowser, from an 18th-century French book about superstitions

Dowsing is a type of divination employed in attempts to locate ground water, buried metals or ores, gemstones, oil, gravesites,[1] and many other objects and materials without the use of scientific apparatus. Dowsing is considered a pseudoscience, and there is no scientific evidence that it is any more effective than random chance.[2][3]

Dowsing is also known as divining (especially in reference to interpretation of results),[4] doodlebugging[5] (particularly in the United States, in searching for petroleum[6]) or (when searching specifically for water) water finding, water witching (in the United States) or water dowsing.

A Y- or L-shaped twig or rod, called a dowsing rod, divining rod (Latin: virgula divina or baculus divinatorius), a “vining rod” or witching rod is sometimes used during dowsing, although some dowsers use other equipment or no equipment at all.

Dowsing appears to have arisen in the context of Renaissance magic in Germany, and it remains popular among believers in Forteana or radiesthesia.[7]

The motion of dowsing rods is nowadays generally attributed to the ideomotor effect.[8][9]

Source: Dowsing – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

  • Remote Searching: Can Pendulum Dowsing Locate Hidden Objects on a Grid? James L. King, Robert F. Price and Jan A. E. Six – IRVA’s Warcollier Prize Winner 2012

Bob Price (left) with Charles Peltosalo, a participant in the remote searching (dowsing) experiment. INACS received the René Warcollier Prize for the best research proposal at the 2012 International Remote Viewing Conference and reported the results at the 2014 conference.

  • Remote Searching – Baseline Studies
    Jim King, BS, Jan Six, PhD, and Robert F. Price, PhD
    This study examined whether scientific evidence collected under controlled conditions supports the validity of remote searching (dowsing), a form of remote viewing. In 2012 INACS was awarded the Warcollier Prize for the concept from the International Remote Viewing Association. The project is complete, and a paper is in progress.

Source: INACS » Research

 


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Dowsing, Pendulum –

  • Remote Searching: Can Pendulum Dowsing Locate Hidden Objects on a Grid? James L. King, Robert F. Price and Jan A. E. Six – IRVA’s Warcollier Prize Winner 2012